Velocity 2X Review Round Up


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Developed by FuturLab, Velocity 2X is the sequel to Velocity, a shoot ’em up. Players will once again play through a 2D top down shooter on the PlayStation 4 and PS Vita. Here is the Review Round Up for Velocity 2X.


 

Futurlab have come a long way since releasing a little known game called Velocity as a PS Mini. Along with games such as Surge and Coconut Dodge, Velocity itself has also seen a remaster for the PS Vita and finally a proper sequel and for those in the know, one of the most anticipated games of the year.

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The Velocity series is one with humble beginnings,starting as it did as a PS mini shoot ‘em up. The leap from the PSP to the PS Vita with Velocity Ultra brought with it a graphical overhaul, but kept near identical gameplay with some minor alterations to the controls, yet was a remake rather than a sequel. Is Velocity 2X the sequel the original deserves?

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Since the very beginning of video game history, developers have strived to give us new and exciting ways of blowing stuff up in space. Whether it’s deadly invaders from planets unknown or chunks of asteroids, it’s all been in preparation for Velocity 2X. Strap yourself in, grab yourself a glass of tang, attempt to figure out what the hell parsec is – and get yourself ready for the craziest space trip that you’ll take all year.

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Velocity 2X is the sequel to the critically acclaimed Velocity Ultra for PlayStation Vita, created by the talented chaps at Futurlab. This new entry into the franchise has much of the same quality content as its predecessor, but now has all-new platform sections, which add a nice change of pace to the gameplay.

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Velocity 2X is interactive poetry. All of its pieces, all of its movements, all of its systems and mechanics flow seamlessly into and out of one another to create a constant tone of movement and a feeling of endless flow. A mistimed jump, a poorly placed shot, and even death are merely delays; brief hurdles in your pursuit of a perfect run.

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The Velocity games are hard to pin down. Glancing at gameplay footage, you might think they are top-down racers, bullet-hell shooters or space exploration games. You'd be right on all counts. They blend different gameplay mechanics together with wrench-tight controls for a unique experience. The original installment, Velocity, was re-released on Vita as Velocity Ultra (improving graphics and adding some functionality), but the series' first true sequel is Velocity 2X.

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While whizzing through the same level for the tenth time, trying to grab every rescue pod, and destroy every enemy while keeping the accelerator pinned, it dawned on me. Velocity 2X is the best Sonic game to come out in two decades. 

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On August 5th, UK development studio FuturLab made one of the boldest statements of the year when it claimed that Velocity 2X should be a Game of the Year winner. FuturLab noted that a Game of the Year winner should be “best-in-class for audio, graphics, gameplay quality & production value,” as well as claiming that it did things better than a large number of AAA titles.

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I enjoy when games defy easy classification, and if Velocity 2X does anything, it’s that it refuses to settle quietly into a familiar niche. Elements of space shooters and platformers are certainly present, but the focus on speed adds a racing component, some sections have light puzzle features, and an innovative teleportation mechanic adds something fresh and surprising. 

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Shoot-em-ups are weird games. Even if your eyes don’t glaze over from the colorful clutter of bullets and debris flashing onscreen, you’re probably busy dying — fast and often.

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One of Sony Computer Entertainment's home-grown techniques for discovering new types of video game is to drop a number of pieces of paper into a hat, each bearing the name of a different genre or classic game. After these slips are mixed together, a hopeful designer plunges a hand in and draws out two of the names. The idea is that the combinations open up previously unimagined creative pathways to invention and novelty. "Gran Turismo" and "Real-Time Strategy" perhaps. "Minecraft" and "League of Legends". "Dark Souls" and "Dance Dance Revolution". Sony claims this unorthodox approach has influenced a number of projects across the years.

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